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Proceedings Papers
Published: 2022-11-30

Predation ability of Stratiolaelaps scimitus (Acari: Laelapidae) to Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Acari: Acaridae) on edible fungi

Institute of Cash Crops, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Shijiazhuang Hebei 050051, China 2Hebei University of Engineering, College of Landscape and Ecology Engineering, Handan Hebei 056000, China
Institute of Cash Crops, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Shijiazhuang Hebei 050051, China
Modern Agricultural Industry Development Center of Taigu District, Taigu Shanxi 030800, China
Institute of Cash Crops, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Shijiazhuang Hebei 050051, China
Institute of Cash Crops, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Shijiazhuang Hebei 050051, China
Institute of Cash Crops, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Shijiazhuang Hebei 050051, China
Agriculture and Rural Bureau of Yongnian District, Handan Hebei 056000, China
Institute of Cash Crops, Hebei Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences, Shijiazhuang Hebei 050051, China
Acari Stratiolaelaps scimitus Tyrophagus putrescentiae edible fungi prey preference predation

Abstract

Tyrophagus putrescentiae is one of the major pests of many edible fungi, whereas Stratiolaelaps scimitus is one of its main natural predators, which can be used to control T. putrescentiae on edible fungi. In our study, the prey preference and predation ability of S. scimitus to T. putrescentiae were determined in the laboratory. The results showed that both female and male adults of S. scimitus preferred adults to larvae of T. putrescentiae. The daily consumption of female adults of S. scimitus was higher than that of male adult mites. The consumption and predation rates of female and male adult mites reached the maximum within the first hour, then gradually decreased. This research provided a theoretical basis for the mass breeding of S. scimitus and field control of T. putrescentiae for edible fungi.

 

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