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Type: Correspondence
Published: 2024-06-29
Page range: 345-348
Abstract views: 15
PDF downloaded: 0

The first fossil mantis lacewing (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) from Australia

Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Earth and Sustainability Science Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES), University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales 2052, Australia
Division of Invertebrate Zoology, American Museum of Natural History, 200 Central Park West, New York, New York 10024-5102, USA; Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Departamento de Entomología, Museo de Historia Natural, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Av. Arenales 1256 Jesús María, Lima 14, Perú
Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Canberra, Bruce, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Health and Biosecurity, Black Mountain, Australian Capital Territory 2601, Australia
Australian Museum Research Institute, 1 William Street, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia; Earth and Sustainability Science Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences (BEES), University of New South Wales, Kensington, New South Wales 2052, Australia; Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 20560, USA
Neuroptera Mantispidae

Abstract

Mantispidae is a cosmopolitan family of neuropteran insects, with approximately 395 extant species (Ohl et al., 2004; Jepson, 2015; Engel et al., 2018; Li et al., 2023). The family includes some of the most distinctive of lacewings owing to their convergent traits with mantises (Mantodea), complete with elongate prothoraces, prominent and large compound eyes on a moveable head, and powerful raptorial forelegs. Indeed, species of the family are referred to as mantis lacewings or mantid lacewings owing to the considerable similarity. As one would suspect, adults are predatory on a variety of small-bodied arthropods, typically hunting during dusk or night (Snyman et al., 2020). Larvae are also predators, although some are specialised for particular prey (e.g., subfamily Symphrasinae), while those of the nominate subfamily Mantispinae are ectoparasitic on spider egg cases (Redborg, 1998). Extant Mantispidae are found on every continent except Antarctica but show their highest diversity and geographical distribution in Australia and the Americas (Fig. 1A).

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